Changing Perspectives

Energy in the American West

Photographer

Jamey Stillings

Concept

Changing Perspectives is an aerial and ground based examination of large-scale renewable energy development in the American West with a long-term goal of expanding this work to a global study.

Renewable energy development will play an essential role in humankind's long-term survival and the ultimate viability of our global ecosystem. Utility-scale projects, those that add significant power to the electrical grid, manifest a positive shift away from a society dependent upon coal, petroleum, and nuclear power sources. Yet, such projects frequently raise challenging questions about land and resource use, wildlife protection, impact on local communities and respect for cultural sacred sites. This project seeks to foster a clearer understanding of large-scale renewable energy projects and be a constructive pro-active voice for responsible energy development.

Biography

Jamey Stillings' three-decade career spans documentary, fine art and commissioned projects. He has worked around the world for a diverse range of national and international clients.

Changing Perspectives continues Jamey's long-term exploration of human altered landscapes and began in October 2010, when he initiated an aerial survey of the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in California's Mojave Desert. The New York Times Magazine premiered the work as "A Bet on the Sun," in June 2012.

Recent acknowledgements: Recipient of the 2013 Eliot Porter Grant; Library of Congress acquisition -  Ivanpah Solar prints; Critical Mass 2013 Solo Show Award; International Photography Award, 1st Place, Editorial: Environmental, Professional 2013; Communication Arts Photography Annual 2013; Photolucida 2013, Critical Mass TOP 50; Prix Pictet 2013, Nominee.

www.jameystillingsprojects.com

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Featured Projects



Ross Island and the Future of the McMurdo Sound Region


Photographer: Alasdair Turner

We have entered a time when places the least near us beckon us to understand them, to feel them so that while we tred on our part of the Earth they are constantly with us and with our choices. Ross Island and the McMurdo Sound Region and the science being conducted there embody what is left of our critical and fragile ecosystems and our attempts to understand them. They are not land for a nation but a place for the world. This project is intended to emotionally and scientifically engage citizens of every nation about why this place and the incredible science that is being conducted there matters. It will give life to and investigate the science of the region from the earliest expeditions to today’s ongoing research.


Between River and Sea


Photographer: Michael Hanson

Between River and Sea focuses on life in and around Apalachicola, FL. For over a century, an independent, hand-built industry has drifted through the shallow waters of the Apalachicola Bay. This bay, one of the most productive and unique ecosystems in the country, once produced 10% of the nation’s oysters and 90% of Florida's. Today, only a handful of oystermen have work and this community struggles to maintain its tradition and livelihood. Oysters need a mix of freshwater and saltwater. They depend on this balance but the freshwater coming down the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Basin has been drastically cut short by a series of dams and overuse in Georgia and Alabama. As droughts persist alongside a constant pressure from a major metropolitan city at the headwaters, the Apalachicola Bay clings to a trickle of water. The project aims to connect users throughout the watershed and expose what's at the end of the river. It also aims to celebrate the bay and a lifestyle that revolves around the perfect mix of fresh and salt water.


Fracking: Forgotten on the Bakken


Photographer: Bruce Farnsworth

Forgotten on the Bakken illustrates the environmental and cultural impacts of fracking, an industry now underway in 20 states. This project begins on the northern great plains but is representative of experiences throughout fracking country. Traditions of open space and agrarian livelihoods have been disrupted by a flurry of activities associated with the high-volume hydraulic fracturing industry. North Dakota—situated on the Bakken geologic formation—is now the second highest oil-producing state in the nation.